The Old Town & The Castle Hill

The brick tower in Jezuicka Street, whose lower part was preservet, originates from the turn of 16th c. Its side wall is attached to the reconstructed defensive wall with a characteristic brick face and a layer of rubble that fills the space between external brick layers. ...

This fortified gate built in the 14th c. was a part of the defensive city walls. It was also a gateway between the Christian and Jewish quarters, which is why it was often referred to as the Jewish Gate. It was originally built as a quadrilateral structure crowned with crenels. Later on a foregate supported with buttresses was added. ...

The Cracow Gate, one of Lublin’s top landmarks, was built as a part of the city walls in the 14th c. The gate owes its name to the historic royal route leading from Cracow, via Lublin to Vilnius.  It served as a defensive structure, an observation tower for the fire rescue, and a residence of the clock-master operating the clock. The gate also had a trumpeter who would play a bugle call. ...

Originally it was a fortified tower, a part of the city walls, with a gate leading from the castle to the parish church. In the 16th c. it was converted into a residence for vicars who permanently took care of the parish church. ...

Originally it was a rectory of the Parish Church of St. Michael the Archangel. In the second half of the 19th c. the building was confiscated from the Catholic Church by the Russian authorities. Later it was given to the Jewish Community and served as an orphanage for Jewish children (‘the Shelter’) and a nursing home for elderly and disabled Jews. ...

It has always been regarded as the most beautiful Lublin townhouse owing to rich interior design and outstanding decorative Renaissance façade from 1610. The building is crowned with an impressive attic. The 2004 renovation of the façade restored it to its full glory. ...

It has an original Renaissance portal with the Zadora coat of arms, the date 1540 and initial of the name Jan Lubom. The cellar has been turned into a museum - the Fortuna Cellar – where you can see unique historic wall polychromes depicting secular topics. ...

The building dates back to the 16th c., as most townhouses located in the Old Town. Till the end of the 19th c. it had been the property of the Riabinin Family. There lived Jan Riabinin, an eminent historian and archivist who researched the history of Lublin. ...

The Holy Trinity Chapel, situated on the Castle Hill, is one of the most important historic buildings in Lublin. It features beautiful Russo-Byzantine frescoes painted in the first half of the 15th c. at the request of King Ladislaus Jagiello. These paintings on the walls of a Roman-Catholic chapel depict religious images characteristic of the Orthodox Church, which is a unique example of the co-existence of East and West European cultures in Lublin. Among the portraits of saints and biblical scenes there are frescoes presenting Ladislaus Jagiello – and they are the only depictions of the ki ...

The Dominican Order probably arrived in Lublin in 1230. They built a wooden oratory of the Holy Cross, which was later replaced with a brick Church of St. Slanislaus Bishop and Martyr. ...