blue, 13 stops; distance: 3,5 km; 2-4 hours

For many centuries Lublin was a thriving centre of Hebrew and Yiddish culture, where Judaic studies flourished so much that the city was often referred to as the Jerusalem of the Polish Kingdom or even the Jewish Oxford.

First Hebrew publications and prayer books started to be published in Lublin in the mid 16th c. In 1578 Kalonymos ben Mordechai Jaffe established a renowned printing house which largely contributed to the development of Jewish literature. The printing traditions were upheld in the 19th c. by Samuel Arct, owner of a printing house and a bookshop in Lublin, who subsequently moved the company to Warsaw. In the 16th and 17th c. Lublin was the seat of the Council of the Four Lands (Vaad Arba Aratsot) - a central body of local government for the Jews who inhabited the Kingdom of Poland. In the 18th c. Yaakov Yithak Horowitz, the leader of the Polish Hasidic Movement known as the Seer of Lublin, was born here.

The international fame of Lublin is credited to Isaac Bashevis Singer, Nobel Prize winner for literature from the Lublin Region, who in one of his highly acclaimed novels, The Magician of Lublin, described the life of the Jewish community in the 19th c. The first records of the Lublin Jews date back to the second half of the 15th c. indicating the existence of a strong religious community.

Jewish settlements as well as their political, administrative and religious life concentrated in the areas around the castle and in the Old Town. With time these parts of the city became known as the Jewish District. 

As a result of the extermination of the Jewish nation by the Germans during World War II combined with liquidation of all Jewish quarters, much of their heritage was lost. The remaining buildings, cemeteries and synagogues have been preserved to give testimony of the culture, traditions and daily life of the Lublin Jews.

 

  1. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: The Old Jewish Quarter
  2. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: The Seer of Lublin 
  3. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: The Castle Hill
  4. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: The Former Complex of Synagogues
  5. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: The Old Jewish Cemetary
  6. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: The New Jewish Cemetary
  7. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: Yeshiva Chachmei Lublin
  8. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: The Former Jewish Hospital
  9. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: Chewra Nosim
  10. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: The Monument to the Victims of the Ghetto
  11. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: The Former Office of the Central Committee of Jews in Poland
  12. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: Po Farze Square and the former Parish House
  13. Heritage trail of the Lublin Jews: The Grodzka Gate